Nov 07

Results from round 3:

Peter Leko, Hungary (2731) – Vladimir Kramnik, Russia (2760) draw

Levon Aronian Armenia (2797) – Ding Liren, China (2730) draw

Alexander Grischuk, Russia (2795) – Alexander Morozevich, Russia (2724) 1-0

Ernesto Inarkiev, Russia (2688) – Boris Gelfand, Israel (2759) draw

Grischuk,Alexander (2795) – Morozevich,Alexander (2724) [D15]
Tigran Petrosian Memorial (3), 06.11.2014

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 The Chebanenko variation in the Slav Defence is very popular nowadays keeping maximum flexibility in Black’s position. 5.Qc2 Players who don’t like memory contests like to play this reasonable move. 5…g6 A solid and slightly passive continuation. Sharper was 5…dxc4 6.e4 The main variation in this unusual variation is 6.Bg5 Black can answer with 6…dxc4 ( but not 6…Bg7? 7.Bxf6 Bxf6 8.cxd5 cxd5 9.Nxd5! and White wins a pawn.) 7.a4 Bg7 8.e4 a5 9.Bxc4 with a slight advantage according to Bologan. 6…dxe4 7.Nxe4 Bg7 Worth considering was the exchange in the centre with 7…Nxe4 8.Qxe4 and only then 8…Bg7 8.Be2 0-0 9.0-0 Bf5 10.Nxf6+ Bxf6 11.Qb3 Qc7

Can you suggest a good move for White?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.h3! Now Black has to reckon with g2-g4 harrassing the bishop at some moment. 12…c5 13.d5 a5 14.Bh6 Re8 15.g4! A good moment to play Grob’s idea when White’s position is close to fully developed and White enjoys some space. 15…Bc8 16.Rad1 Nd7 Black tries to catch up in development. After 16…a4 White doesn’t need to care about the pawn on b2 and can continue 17.Qe3 Bxb2 18.d6 Qb6 19.Ng5 with a most probable deadly initiative. Black’s pieces are disorientated and White can easily improve his position strongly with every move, Bf3, Rfe1 and so forth. 17.Rfe1 Ra6 The so called rook lift is a clever way of developing the rook when the bishop on c8 stands in the way. 18.Bf1 Rb6 19.Qe3

How should Black capture on b2?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19…Bxb2? An unconventional move but not the right move in this position, normal was 19…Rxb2 with the idea 20.Bf4 Qb6 and Black is more active than in the game. 20.Bf4 Qd8 A Petrosian move like 20…Rd6 would not help after 21.Rb1 (21.Bxd6?! Qxd6 and Black has good control of the Black squares.) 21…Bg7 22.Nd2 and Ne4 is in the air.

How can White seize the initiative?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.Ng5! Bd4 22.Qg3 e5 23.dxe6 fxe6 24.Bg2 e5? 24…Qf6 was a better defence. Now Black’s position starts to crack.

What's the problem with Black's last move?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25.Bd2?! Simpler was 25.Qh4 Nf6 26.Bd5+, for instance 26…Be6 (or 26…Kg7 27.Nf7 winning.) 27.Nxe6 Rbxe6 28.Bg5 Kg7 29.Bh6+ Kh8 a) 29…Kg8 30.Rxe5!! Nxd5 31.Qxd8 Rxd8 32.Rxe6 and White is clearly winning. b) 29…Kf7 30.Be3 with good winning chances. (but not 30.Rxe5?? Nxd5 31.Qxd8 Rxd8 32.Rxd5 Rxd5 33.cxd5 Re2 and Black has good winning chances.) 30.Bxe6 Rxe6 31.Be3 with good winning chances. 25…Rf6 25…Kg7 26.Bd5 doesn’t solve Black’s insurmountable problems. 26.Nf3 26.Bd5+ first followed by knight move to f3 or e4 was also good. 26…Nb6? Now Black loses by force. 26…Qb6 27.Nxd4 cxd4 28.Bd5+ Kg7 29.f4 And White’s pair of Bishops will eventually decide the game.

How does White decide the game?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27.Nxd4 When Black’s proud bishop on d4 fall everything falls apart. 27…exd4 27…cxd4 28.Rxe5 and Black is busted. 28.Bg5 28.Bxa5 was also winning. In such positions it’s a matter of personality. 28…Ref8 29.Qe5 Nd7 30.Bxf6 Qxf6 31.Qxf6 Nxf6 32.Rb1 Rf7 33.g5 Nd7 34.Re8+ Rf8 35.Bd5+ Kh8 36.Rbe1 1-0 A very convincing third win by Grischuk who is now in a clear lead with one point. Remember that Grischuk also won the three last games in Baku so at the moment he has six wins in a row!

Round 4 on Saturday has the following meetings:

Vladimir Kramnik, Russia (2760) 2 p. – Boris Gelfand, Israel (2759) 1 p.

Alexander Morozevich, Russia (2724) 1 p. – Ernesto Inarkiev, Russia (2688) 0,5 p.

Ding Liren, China (2730) 1,5 p. – Alexander Grischuk, Russia (2795) 3 p.

Peter Leko, Hungary (2731) 1,5 p. – Levon Aronian, Armenia (2797) 1,5 p.

There is more information on tashir-chess.com

The games can be seen live at chessbomb.com or livechesstournaments.com


 

 

 






Läs de 2 kommentarerna till “Grischuk leads Tigran Petrosian Memorial 2014 after round 3”

  1. E säger:

    Varför är nyhetsinläggen och partikommentarerna skrivna på engelska?

  2. Thomas Engqvist säger:

    Tanken är att reportage som handlar om utländska turneringar ska kunna läsas internationellt och inte bara av en svensk läsekrets. Reportage om svenska turneringar kommer dock att skrivas på svenska som tidigare.

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