nov 06

Results from round 2:

Vladimir Kramnik, Ryssland (2760) – Ernesto Inarkiev, Russia (2688) 1-0

Boris Gelfand, Israel (2759) – Alexander Grischuk, Russia (2795) 0-1

Alexander Morozevich, Russia (2724) – Levon Aronian, Armenia (2797) draw

Ding Liren, China (2730) – Peter Leko, Hungary (2731) draw

Gelfand,Boris (2759) – Grischuk,Alexander (2795) [D83]
Tigran Petrosian Memorial (2), 05.11.2014

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bf4 A solid variation in the Grünfeld Defence. Gelfand is famous for his earlier successes with the sharp system 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 c5 7.Nf3 Bg7 8.Rb1 and so forth. 4…Bg7 5.e3 0-0 6.Rc1 Be6 6…c5 7.dxc5 Be6 is also a satisfactory continuation for Black. 7.c5 7.Qb3 looks more critical. 7…c6 8.Bd3

Suggest a slightly unconventional move for Black!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8…Bc8!? The idea is in the spirit of Philidor not to have any piece in front of the e-pawn. 9.h3 White secures the bishop on the London diagonal and keeps the control of the important e5-square. 9…Nfd7 10.Nf3 e5! Better than the preparatory 10…Re8 which isn’t necessary in this position. 11.dxe5 11.Nxe5 Nxe5 12.Bxe5 (or 12.dxe5 Nd7) 12…Bxe5 13.dxe5 Qg5 and Black is fine. 11…Nxc5 12.Bb1 Nbd7 13.b4 13.0-0 immediately is more solid. 13…Ne6 14.0-0 Nxf4 15.exf4 Gelfand who is a great admirer of Rubinstein’s great games doesn’t mind such exchanges.

How should Black continue?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15…Nb6 A good square for the knight eyeing the weak c4-square. 16.Qd4 16.b5 is answered by 16…c5 16…f6 17.b5 Nc4 18.bxc6 bxc6 19.Bd3 fxe5 20.Nxe5 Prevents variations where Black can sacrifice the exchange for the knight on f3. 20.fxe5 with the idea 20…Rxf3 21.Bxc4 (not 21.gxf3?? Bxe5 22.Qc5 Qg5+ 23.Kh1 Qf4 and White will be mated on h2.) 21…Bxh3 22.Nxd5! is not so easy to calculate over the board.

Suggest Black's strongest continuation!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20…Bxe5! The most precise continuation. 21.fxe5 Nd2 22.Rfd1 Qg5 This is the main point with 20…Bxe5! threatening 23…Nf3 and 23…Bxh3. 23.Qe3 Nf3+ 24.Kh1 Qxe3 25.fxe3 Nxe5 26.e4 Gelfand tries to open the position to exploit his better development. 26…d4 Grischuck’s technique is truly merciless. 27.Na4 Rb8 28.Bc4+ Kg7 29.Rxd4 White has won back the pawn but the price is heavy. Black’s activity is worth at least a pawn. 29…Rb4 One of the most important tactical devices in chess is the pin 30.Nc5 Rf2 31.a3 Rbb2 The pin has been removed but Black has control of the seventh rank instead. Nimzowitsch would be happy since he believed this device was one of the elements in chess. 32.Na4

What is Black's best move?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32…Bxh3 Bang! Grischuk does everything right, both strategically and tactically. 33.Nxb2 Bxg2+ 34.Kh2 34.Kg1 Rxb2 with a nasty mate threat on f3. 34…Rxb2 35.Kg3 g5 36.Rcd1 h5 37.R4d2 Rxd2 38.Rxd2 Bxe4 39.Re2 h4+ 40.Kf2 Ng4+ 41.Kg1 Nf6 Everything has been exactly calculated by Grischuk. Another win is 41…h3 42.Rxe4 h2+ 43.Kg2 h1Q+ 44.Kxh1 Nf2+ 45.Kg2 Nxe4. It’s just a matter of taste. 42.Be6 Kg6 43.Re1 Bf3 44.Re5 g4 45.Bf5+ Kh6 46.Bd3 Bd5 47.Bf1 g3 48.Bh3 Ne4 49.Be6

Find a strong move for Black!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49…Nf2! An excellent square for the knight as soon will be seen. 50.Bxd5 cxd5 51.Kg2 d4 52.Rd5 d3 53.a4 a5 54.Kf3 Kg6 55.Rd8 Kf7 56.Rd4 Kf8 57.Rd5 Ke8 58.Rd4 Ke7 59.Rd5 Kf6 60.Rd6+ Kf5 61.Rd4 Ke6 62.Rd8 Ke5 63.Rd7

Suggest the smoothest win for Black!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now when the king is optimally placed the moment has come to decide the game. 63…h3! 64.Kxg3 Ne4+ 65.Kf3 h2 66.Kg2 d2 0-1 Splendid creativity and a good technical performance by Grischuk. Grischuk is at the present moment ranked number three in the world with 2803.

Standings:

1. Alexander Grischuk 2 points

2. Vladimir Kramnik 1,5 point

3. Levon Aronian 1 point

4. Alexander Morozevich 1 point

5. Ding Liren 1 point

6. Peter Leko 1 point

7. Boris Gelfand 0,5 point

8. Ernesto Inarkeiv 0 point

Round 3 has the following meetings:

Peter Leko, Hungary (2731) – Vladimir Kramnik, Russia (2760)

Levon Aronian (Armenia) 2797 – Ding Liren, China (2730)

Alexander Grischuk, Russia (2795) – Alexander Morozevich, Russia (2724)

Ernesto Inarkiev, Russia (2688) – Boris Gelfand, Israel (2759)

There is more information on tashir-chess.com

The games can be seen live at chessbomb.com or livechesstournaments.com






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